Frequently Asked Questions

How much of your donations actually goes to the cause?

Pilots to the Rescue is a 501c3 non-profit and our intentions are to use all donations and monies received to support the cause of air rescue efforts. However, most of our volunteer pilots are private pilots and not available for hire. Thus, according to the FAA any monies paid or reimbursed to said pilots is considered compensation of flight and not allowable. Unfortunately, this makes it very difficult to use donations for actual flight rescues. Private pilots are required to pay for rescue flights out of their own pocket and deem what portion is deductible on their personal tax returns. Thus, most of our donations go to supporting these rescue efforts, i.e. website development, marketing, promotional materials, events, etc.

Are your pilots paid or reimbursed?

No. Most of our pilots are volunteer private pilots and not available for hire. Thus, according to the FAA any monies paid or reimbursed to said pilots is considered compensation of flight and not allowable. Private pilots are required to pay for rescue flights out of their own pocket and deem what portion is deductible on their personal tax returns.

What are some guidelines for flying animals?

Take into consideration the sizes, weights and temperaments of all animals as well as the crates they come in. If you have any doubt, ask the origin shelter/foster. Fitting all your animals in for transport is akin to a giant game of Tetris! Sometimes animals can be tethered in the back seat if they get along but using some sort of retention advice is advisable.

It is recommended to allow the animals to go to the bathroom before being loaded. Be prepared for animals to go to the bathroom or vomit on the plane. Carry plastic bags, odor eraser and paper towels. Waterproof tarps, drop clothes, seat covers or even a sheet to line the interior of your plane is highly recommended! Don’t feed the animals much prior to flight. After the flight is complete, feel free to give them food and water.

Unless the animals have behavior problems, it’s unnecessary to sedate them. Check with the origin shelter/foster if you have any doubts. Most of the animals go to sleep once in the air.

Make sure you have all the paperwork and medicine (if applicable) for each animal.

Always clean your crates and plane seats after each transport to avoid viruses.

Minimize the rate of those climbs or descents to minimize the discomfort to animals.

Bring a “co-pilot” with you to help assist with the animals. It’s not advisable to do these missions solo.

What are some guidelines for rescue organizations?

Here are some important guidelines for determining if your animals are fit for air transport.

Can your animal be moved? They must be able to be transported from a vehicle to an airplane and perhaps several.

Does your animal have any special needs? Please make sure the pilots are aware.

Keep in mind the flight times and distances that the pilots will travel. Average flight time is 2 hours round-trip thus, this rescue could involve pilot relays with multiple pilots involved doing the rescue. The animals will have to endure not only being transported from car to plane but plane to plane. Multiple take offs and landings. Make sure they are fit to fly!

Maintenance and weather issues do come up. Make sure you have a back up plan which might mean driving long distances to pick up stranded animals. You will also be responsible for finding appropriate foster/boarder in case of these issues.

Do not feed/allow drinking much prior to flight. after no problem.

Make sure you communicate with all parties involved and have the flight itinerary available. Cell phones and email contact information is recommended.

Arrive to the airport early. Don’t make your pilots wait.

Please have all necessary paperwork, collar, leash, medicines for all your animals. All animals should be clearly labeled as well as their crates.

Check state to state requirements.

6. Please have the necessary paperwork that is accompanying the animal and a collar and leash supplied. An ID collar should be on your animal with sending and receiving parties and contact information listed. NO bandanas, coats or sweaters please! A rabies certificate and a health certificate are needed.

The Pilot in Command (PIC) ultimately determined if your animals are fit to fly. They also determine weather, timing, condition of plane, etc. Understand the complexity of flight and adding this element to their mission. Do not pressure or push them to fly when they do not think it is advisable.

Can I rescue animals on my current trips? AIRLINE POLICY LIST HERE

 

We have a list of most major and regional airlines below. If you wish to take advantage of one of your trips and you are willing to cover the fee to transport an animal we will help in coordinating and assisting saving an animal. Just think, with the trip you are already taking you can save one of these beautiful animals!

The owner/shelter/foster or rescue can assign a person to take the pet on all airlines listed below unless otherwise noted. Of the airlines that do ship pets as cargo most will not accept Brachycephalic or “short-nosed” dogs and cats of the following breeds: Dogs: Boston terrier, Boxer (all breeds), Bull dog (all breeds), Bull terrier, Brussels griffon, Chow chow, English toy spaniel, Japanese spaniel/Japanese chin, mastiff (all breeds), Pekingese, Pit bull (all breeds), Pug & mixes, Shih tzu, Staffordshire terrier. Cats: Burmese, Exotic Shorthair, Himalayan, Persian.

 

 

MAJOR AIRLINES Alaska Airlines – Pet in cabin – $100.00 USD each way Pet in baggage – $100.00 USD each way. Animal doesn’t have to be owned the traveler and can be a rescue pet. • The pet carrier counts toward your carry-on bag allotment. You may bring either a pet carrier and a personal item, or a pet carrier and a standard size carry-on bag. You may not board the aircraft with a pet carrier, a standard size carry-on, and a personal item. • A customer may travel with a maximum of 2 pet carriers in the main cabin, only when the adjacent seat is purchased by the same customer. • Pets allowed in the passenger cabin are dogs, cats, rabbits, and household birds. Dogs and cats must be at least 8 weeks old and must have been fully weaned. • Up to 2 pets of the same species and similar size may travel in the same carrier, provided no body parts protrude from the carrier and the animals are not in distress. Brachycephalic or “short-nosed” dogs and cats are not accepted for travel in the cargo compartment on Alaska Airlines flights (including flights operated by Horizon, SkyWest, or PenAir). Dogs: boston terrier, boxer (all breeds), bull dog (all breeds), bull terrier, brussels griffon, chow chow, english toy spaniel, japanese spaniel/japanese chin, mastiff (all breeds), pekingese, pit bull (all breeds), pug (all breeds), shih tzu, staffordshire terrier. Cats: Burmese, Exotic Shorthair, Himalayan, Persian. All pets traveling in the cargo compartment on Alaska Airlines (including flights operated by Horizon, SkyWest and PenAir) must have a health certificate dated within 10 days of initial travel and 30 days of return travel, when the return flight is booked in the same record. Pets traveling on a return flight booked in a separate record are required to have a health certificate dated within 10 days of that flight. A health certificate is not required for pets traveling in the cabin with their passenger; however, many states have specific importation health and vaccination requirements.
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